Florida Dangerous Dog Registry

It’s a crime to own a dog that “aggressively attacks”

someone and causes severe injury or death.

Source Florida Statutes, Chapter 767, and the Chapter 20.

The State of Florida Needs A State Wide

Dangerous Dog Registry

( Modeled after the state’s sex offender registry web site )

County Dangerous Dog Web Sites in Florida

Charlotte County, Florida http://charlottecountyfl.com/Animal/DangerousAnimals.asp

Orange County, Florida http://www.orangecountyfl.net/cms/DEPT/CEsrvcs/animal/potentially.htm

Seminole County, Florida http://www.seminolecountyfl.gov/dps/ansrvs/dangerousdogs.asp

HELP SUPPORT THIS EFFORT BY CONTACTING

Governor Charlie.Crist@MyFlorida.com

Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services

Charles H. Bronson, commissioner@doacs.state.fl.us  

2009 Directory of The Florida Senate http://www.flsenate.gov/Legislators/index.cfm?Mode=Member%20Pages&Submenu=1&Tab=legislators&CFID=149721092&CFTOKEN=76740575  

2009 Directory of The Florida House of Representatives

http://www.myfloridahouse.gov/Sections/Documents/htmlcontainer.aspx?DocumentType=House%20Directory&DisplayTitle=House%20Directory&FileName=house%20directory.htm

This Domain Name and Web Site will be transferred and donated to the

State of Florida when the state is ready to establish

Florida Dangerous Dog Registry Web Site

 

How it Works:

The State of Florida Dangerous Dog Registry web site can provide a mechanism for residents to determine if dangerous dogs reside in their neighborhoods and for local animal control officials to post information about dogs that have been declared dangerous by the local court. It allows residents to find dogs that have attacked a person or an animal, and that a judge has decided could cause injury again.

FloridaDangerousDogRegistry.com can be maintained by the Florida Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services and Office of Veterinary Services. Each owner of any canine or canine crossbreed found by any court of competent jurisdiction to be a dangerous dog shall be required to register the animal as a dangerous dog within 45 days of such finding. The State Veterinarian shall receive, post, and maintain the information provided by the owner, animal control officers, and other such officials statewide on a website. All information collected for the Dangerous Dog Registry shall be available to animal control officers via the website.

Registration: shall include the name of the animal, a photograph, sex, age, weight, primary breed, secondary breed, color and markings, whether spayed or neutered, the acts that resulted in the dog being designated as dangerous and associated trial docket information, microchip or tattoo number, address where the animal is maintained, name of the owner, address of the owner, telephone numbers of the owner, and a statement that the owner has complied with the provisions of the dangerous dog order. The address of the owner along with the name and breed of the dangerous dog, the acts that resulted in the dog being deemed dangerous, and information necessary to access court records of the adjudication shall be available to the general public

Verification: The owner shall verify the information is accurate by annual resubmissions. The owner shall submit to the State Veterinarian a $100 initial registration fee and a $35 renewal registration fee. In the event that the dangerous dog is moved to a different location, or contact information for the owner changes in any way at any time, the owner shall submit a renewal containing the address of the new location or other updated information within 10 days of such move or change. There shall be no charge for any updated information provided between renewals. Any funds collected pursuant to this section shall be used by the State Veterinarian to maintain the registry and website. The website list shall be known as the Florida Dangerous Dog Registry.

Notification: If you see a dog on the list and the dog is neither confined nor restrained, please report your observation to Florida Veterinary Services 352-333-3120. The number is answered 24 hours a day, 7 days a week. They will respond and investigate the complaint.

Mission: The Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services is to safeguard the public: Charles H. Bronson, Commissioner Florida Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services, (850) 488-3022

Definition: “Dangerous Dog” Has aggressively bitten, attacked, or endangered or has inflicted severe injury on a human being on public or private property.

Has more than once severely injured or killed a domestic animal while off the owner’s property.

Has, when unprovoked, chased or approached a person upon a street or sidewalks, or any public grounds in a menacing fashion or apparent attitude of attack, provided that such actions are attested to in a sworn statement by one or more persons and dutifully investigated by the appropriate authority.

Has been used primarily or in part for the purpose of dog fighting or is a dog trained for dog fighting.

Source: http://www.leg.state.fl.us/statutes/index.cfm?mode=View%20Statutes&SubMenu=1&App_mode=Display_Statute&Search_String=animal&URL=CH0767/Sec12.HTM

Definition: “Unprovoked” means that the victim who has been conducting himself
peacefully and lawfully has been bitten or chased in a menacing fashion or attacked by a dog.

Definition: “Severe injury” means any physical injury that results in broken bones,
multiple bites, or disfiguring lacerations requiring sutures or reconstructive surgery.

Muzzle and Restrain Rules” It is unlawful for the owner of a dangerous dog to permit the dog to be outside a proper enclosure unless the dog is muzzled and restrained. When being transported, such dogs must be safely and securely restrained within a vehicle.

By The Numbers When Man’s Best Friend Starts Biting

  • 50 percent of bites go unreported

  • 800,000 people annually require medical treatment for dog bites

  • 14,295 claims paid by insurers in 2005

  • 14,661 claims paid by insurers in 2006

  • 14,531 claims paid by insurers in 2007

  • 3,500 average number of postal workers bitten each year

  • 9% of the fatalities involved chained dogs.

  • 65% of the fatalities were by pit bulls.

  • 78% of the human fatalities were by dogs in their own yard.

  • 39% of the fatalities involved multiple dogs

  • 20% of fatal dog attacks involved a new person sharing a household

  • 16 fatal dog attacks in 2009.

  • 23 fatal dog attacks in 2008,

  • 33 fatal dog attacks in 2007.

  • 238 fatal dog bites in the U.S. from 1979-1998

  • 2007, Orange County, Florida reported 1,208 dog bites

  • 2007 Pinellas County, Florida reported 1,233 dog bites

  • 2007 Leon County, Florida reported 322 dog bites, 97 attributed to bull-type dogs

  • 2005 Charlotte County, Florida reported 480 dog bites

  • Labrador Retrievers represent 9 percent of the dog population accounted for 11.5 percent of the bites

  • 74.8 million dogs in the United States

Sources: National Canine Research Council, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, United States Postal Service, Insurance Information Institute

State of Florida Dangerous Dog Law

Source: http://www.leg.state.fl.us/statutes/index.cfm?mode=View%20Statutes&SubMenu=1&App_mode=Display_Statute&Search_String=animal&URL=CH0767/Sec12.HTM

(1) “Dangerous dog” means any dog that according to the records of the appropriate authority:

(a) Has aggressively bitten, attacked, or endangered or has inflicted severe injury on a human being on public or private property;

(b) Has more than once severely injured or killed a domestic animal while off the owner’s property;

(c) Has been used primarily or in part for the purpose of dog fighting or is a dog trained for dog fighting; or

(d) Has, when unprovoked, chased or approached a person upon the streets, sidewalks, or any public grounds in a menacing fashion or apparent attitude of attack, provided that such actions are attested to in a sworn statement by one or more persons and dutifully investigated by the appropriate authority.

(2) “Unprovoked” means that the victim who has been conducting himself or herself peacefully and lawfully has been bitten or chased in a menacing fashion or attacked by a dog.

(3) “Severe injury” means any physical injury that results in broken bones, multiple bites, or disfiguring lacerations requiring sutures or reconstructive surgery.

(4) “Proper enclosure of a dangerous dog” means, while on the owner’s property, a dangerous dog is securely confined indoors or in a securely enclosed and locked pen or structure, suitable to prevent the entry of young children and designed to prevent the animal from escaping. Such pen or structure shall have secure sides and a secure top to prevent the dog from escaping over, under, or through the structure and shall also provide protection from the elements.

(5) “Animal control authority” means an entity acting alone or in concert with other local governmental units and authorized by them to enforce the animal control laws of the city, county, or state. In those areas not served by an animal control authority, the sheriff shall carry out the duties of the animal control authority under this act.

(6) “Animal control officer” means any individual employed, contracted with, or appointed by the animal control authority for the purpose of aiding in the enforcement of this act or any other law or ordinance relating to the licensure of animals, control of animals, or seizure and impoundment of animals and includes any state or local law enforcement officer or other employee whose duties in whole or in part include assignments that involve the seizure and impoundment of any animal.

(7) “Owner” means any person, firm, corporation, or organization possessing, harboring, keeping, or having control or custody of an animal or, if the animal is owned by a person under the age of 18, that person’s parent or guardian.

767.04. Dog owner’s liability for damages to persons bitten

The owner of any dog that bites any person while such person is on or in a public place, or lawfully on or in a private place, including the property of the owner of the dog, is liable for damages suffered by persons bitten, regardless of the former viciousness of the dog or the owners’ knowledge of such viciousness. However, any negligence on the part of the person bitten that is a proximate cause of the biting incident reduces the liability of the owner of the dog by the percentage that the bitten person’s negligence contributed to the biting incident. A person is lawfully upon private property of such owner within the meaning of this act when the person is on such property in the performance of any duty imposed upon him or her by the laws of this state or by the laws or postal regulations of the United States, or when the person is on such property upon invitation, expressed or implied, of the owner. However, the owner is not liable, except as to a person under the age of 6, or unless the damages are proximately caused by a negligent act or omission of the owner, if at the time of any such injury the owner had displayed in a prominent place on his or her premises a sign easily readable including the words “Bad Dog.” The remedy provided by this section is in addition to and cumulative with any other remedy provided by statute or common law.

“The owners of any dog which shall bite any person, while such person is on or in a public place, or lawfully on or in a private place, including the property of the owner of such dogs, shall be liable for such damages as may be suffered by persons bitten, regardless of the former viciousness of such dog or the owners’ knowledge of such viciousness. A person is lawfully upon private property of such owner within the meaning of this act when he is on such property in the performance of any duty imposed upon him by the laws of this state or by the laws or postal regulations of the United States, or when he is on such property upon invitation, expressed or implied, of the owner thereof; provided, however, no owner of any dog shall be liable for any damages to any person or his property when such person shall mischievously or carelessly provoke or aggravate the dog inflicting such damage; nor shall any such owner be so liable if at the time of any such injury he had displayed in a prominent place on his premises a sign easily readable including the words “Bad Dog.”

To learn more about the Dog Bite Epidemic.

The most trusted and extensive resource for dog bite victims, dog owners, parents, journalists and others needing to learn about the legal rights of victims, and other aspects of the dog bite epidemic.

A non-commercial website, updated daily, authored by the USA’s leading legal expert in dog bite law. Almost 1 million people per year (2,500 each day) spend an average of 10 minutes reading www.dogbitelaw.com Over 2,500 websites throughout the world link to or site www.dogbitelaw.com including the U.S. Department of Agriculture and other governmental websites.

Published on July 10, 2009 at 1:41 PM  Leave a Comment  

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

%d bloggers like this: